The Difference Between Content Marketing Farms, Curators & Colleagues

Molly Bruno

Written by Molly Bruno on Wed, Jan 22, 2014

If you are seeking out content marketing in one form or another to bolster your business’s brand, overall message or online presence, then you’re already off to a promising start. Many business owners have one end result in mind: a thriving business. Be it through meaningful connections, authentic content or a strong handle on SEO, the final goal is the same.

So, how can you get started?

There are several ways to achieve your desired results. Take a look and find out which content marketing method is the right fit for your business.  

cubiclesContent Farm

A content farm is usually comprised of 2,000 to 8,000 freelancer writers and focuses on quantity rather than strategy. This option means a rapid turnaround of content from many different people. Because a lot of material is produced quickly, the content runs the risk of not resonating with readers. If freelancers don’t know your business on an intimate level, capturing your intended message becomes very difficult.

Content Curator

A content curator finds and presents previously published digital content about a specific topic. Content curators usually don’t create original content, so you actually lease content using this method. Because you are unable to own or brand the content presented, it makes the information difficult to leverage across social media and only a portion of the story is published.

Content Colleague/Partner

A content colleague or partner is the most comprehensive option to help your business reach its end goal. A content colleague focuses on quality and strategy and provides you with original content that you own and that can be leveraged across multiple channels. Above all, a content colleague creates everything around your unique company to tell your story.

Although each option uses content to enhance your business, it’s important to note the differences. Which is right for your business: a content farm, a content curator or a content colleague? Our free guide can help you answer that question.

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